Hatty’s song – Poppy on the wall

After her group lesson based on the Gordon’s Music Learning Theory, when everyone was getting ready to go home, Hatty (3yo) was strumming the ukulele and composing this song by herself.
She then came over to me and asked me to accompany her on the uke. 
Her mum and me had so much fun listening to her little concert that we decided to take a video and share it because we loved all the improvisations that Hatty was doing throughout the song! 
She’s changing the rhythms and the words, always checking the uke part, keep listening to the music. I also love her way of moving.

Thanks to her mum Morgan for allowing me to use the video! 
Well done Hatty!

Tiziana

CHILDREN’S MOTOR RESPONSES TO MUSIC

Today we’d love to talk about one of the ways in which we get more in touch with our students’ musical learning progress: the observation of their motor responses to music.

Some of the easiest reactions to notice are the little legs (or little hands) moving to the beat. Finding ourselves moving when we listen to music happens to all of us, most of the time unconsciously.
Rhythm, although, is something that gets stable later in the age (if properly supported).

So, how should we consider these little movements showed by the children during the sessions?
We should remember that children’s body movement is in resonance with what they’re listening to, namely the music that surrounds them.

We can say that music moves the child even before the child knows it.

Children move unconsciously, in a space that is specially created for their freedom to experiment.

Furthermore, during the sessions, we can often observe children swaying with their whole bodies to the beat, shifting the weight from one leg to another, most of the time accordingly to the tempo and the speed of the music. Their centre of gravity is perfectly linked to the ground.

What else can we observe? 
Children move, run, jump. They fall. 
We can pay attention and notice exactly when that happens. We will then see that children fall on the musical cadences; at the end of the musical phrases; or at the end of the songs, meaning that they are constantly listening and following the music (even if they’re not looking at us).

Now is the moment to ask you… have you ever observed your students’ movement? Have you ever paid attention to these details? 
By doing it, you will be able to evaluate children’s rhythm development in a very natural way.

Why don’t you try to catch their motor responses in your next sessions and share with us your discoveries? 
You can describe them here in the comments or use the hashtag #firststepsinmusicon Instagram (remember to tag @Gordon UK so it will be easier for us to find you).

THE IMPORTANCE OF NON- VERBAL COMMUNICATION IN EARLY YEARS MUSIC

In a non-verbal context such as a music lesson that follows the Gordon’s MLT principles, body language becomes very important. Every glance, small movement or smile becomes a way of communicating with the children.

As we sing the songs, we observe the children and their parents, trying to capture their mood and their needs. Children aged between 0 to 3 cannot yet verbalise how they feel but through the body language, they express their entire world. They can tell us if they’re happy; if they feel good in the group; if they need more time to feel free to explore the space; if they are not yet ready to imitate our musical productions.

Everything is written in their expressions, in their way of moving and interacting.

Eventually, when they feel welcomed, they are ready to share and play with the sounds, without fear of experimenting, in a totally non-judgmental environment.E

Right there, at that moment, when the necessary trust between the educator and the child has been created, the most important learning window of the human being’s life opens up. That is the space for us as educators to enter and step by step share our experience, sometimes on tiptoes, sometimes jumping!

FIRST STEPS IN MUSIC – LISTENING. A FREE 5-day course online

Gordon UK – Music Research Institute is launching its first project!

FIRST STEPS IN MUSIC – LISTENING is a FREE 5-day course online that will help you to create a musical listening path with your students.

In the last weeks, we have worked hard to prepare this training opportunity and we hope you’ll find it interesting!

You will find many tips on how to create a good environment for listening, and insights on the role of silence and movement in children’s musical learning. At the end of the 5th day, there will also be a special gift for you.

This offer is exclusively for subscribers to our newsletter. So, if you don’t want to miss out, subscribe to the link below👇🏻 Check your inbox (or junk mail) to start the course 📨

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My three words for music therapy

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Flexibility is a good word to describe music therapy.
Improvisation is another good word.
Unpredictability another one.

Today I run a session with H., my 3 years old autistic patient. 
Today he needed the mum inside the room. 

This was not in my plans but I knew it could happen due to his young age. So she joined the session, coming into the room followed by her second little boy, younger than H., that was playing in the waiting room with her.

H., mum and brother, all of us making music together.

I had to change all my plans for this session. We discovered new musical games that H. seemed to like and we followed his needs.

It wasn’t the easiest session ever but we were there for him, all of us, and he gave us some big smiles and eye contacts. The mum is a pretty special mum and the baby brother as well. This helped me a lot.

The music therapy setting needs to be a safe place for the patients, especially in cases like this one, with really young children.
So it doesn’t matter if this kind of session goes out of the schemes, if I haven’t read about it in my books.
I felt that including the rest of the family was the right things to do, today.
I’m sure that little by little he will be able to stay alone with me again, as he did before.

I learnt something new today and I will keep remembering those three words in my future practice:

Flexibility – Improvisation – Unpredictability